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California Leads the US in Online Privacy Rules

California Leads the US in Online Privacy Rules

  • Jean-Michel Franco
    Jean-Michel Franco is Director of Product Marketing for Talend. He has dedicated his career to developing and broadening the adoption of innovative technologies in companies. Prior to joining Talend, he started out at EDS (now HP) by creating and developing a business intelligence (BI) practice, joined SAP EMEA as Director of Marketing Solutions in France and North Africa, and then lately Business & Decision as Innovation Director. He authored 4 books and regularly publishes articles, presents at events and tradeshows and can be followed on Twitter: @jmichel_franco

With California often being looked to as the state of innovation, the newly enforced California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) came as no surprise. This new online privacy law gives consumers the right to know what information companies are collecting about them, why they are collecting that data, and who they are sharing it with.

Some specific industries such as Banking or Health Sciences had already considered this type of compliance at the core of their digital transformation. But as the CCPA applies to potentially any company, no matter its size or industry, anyone serious about personalizing interactions with their visitors, prospects, customers, and employees needs to pay attention.

Similarities to GDPR

Although there are indeed some differences between GDPR and the CCPA, in terms of the data management and governance frameworks that needs to be established, the two are similar. These similarities include:

  • You need to know where your personal data is across your different system, which means that you need to run a data mapping exercise
  • You need to create a 360° view of your personal data and manage consent at a fine grain, although CCPA looks more permissive on consent than GDPR
  • You need to publish a privacy notice where you tell the regulation authorities, customers and other stakeholders what you are doing with the personal information within your database. You need to anonymize data (i.e. through data masking) for any other systems that includes personal data, but that you want to scope out from your compliance effort and privacy notice.   
  • You need to foster accountabilities so that the people in the companies that participate in the data processing effort are engaged for compliance
  • You need to know where your data is, including when it is shared or processed through third parties such as business partners or cloud providers. You need to control cross border data transfers and potential breaches while transparently communicating in cases of breaches 
  • You need to enact the data subject access rights, such as the right for data access, data rectification, data deletion, and data portability. CCPA allows a little more time to answer to a request, 45 days versus 1 month.  

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Key Takeaways from the CCPA

The most important takeaway is that data privacy regulations are burgeoning for companies all over the world. With the stakes getting higher and higher, from the steep fines to the reputation risks, compliance consumers that can negatively affect the benefits of digital transformation).

While this law in its current state is specific to California, the idea of a ripple effect at the federal level might not be far off.  So instead of seeing it as a burden, such regulations should be taken as an opportunity. In fact, one of the side effects of all those regulations, today with data scandals now negatively impacting millions of consumers, is that data privacy now makes the headlines. Consumers are now understanding how valuable their data can be and how damaging the impact of losing control over personal data could be.

The lesson learned is that, although regulatory compliance is often what triggers a data privacy compliance project, it shouldn't be the only driver. The goal is rather to establish a system of trust with your customers for their personal data. In a recent benchmark, where we exercised our right of data access and privacy against more than 100 companies, we could demonstrate that most company are very low on their maturity for achieving that goal. But it demonstrated as well that the best in class are setting the standards for turning it into a memorable experience.

 

 

 

 

 

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